April 11, 2016
by Brooke Duffy
Comments Off on Celebrate National Library Week – Libraries Transform! Cake and Tours on Wednesday at 2:30

Celebrate National Library Week – Libraries Transform! Cake and Tours on Wednesday at 2:30

From ala.org

The American Library Association’s theme this year for National Library Week (4/10-4/16) is “Libraries Transform”. We love that the theme has dual meanings - that libraries transform people AND that libraries transform as a result of people.

Cake & Conversation with Library Staff

Join us on Wednesday 4/13, from 2:30-3:30pm for cake! We’d love the opportunity to informally chat and catch up with you, to talk about your projects and needs, how libraries have transformed your work, and how we can further transform with you. We'll also have information about some of our newest resources, and tours of our newest library spaces.

New spaces include:

  • Practice Presentation Room on upper level
  • Graduate Student Study Space on lower level
  • Celtic Collection on lower level
  • Research Consultation Room on main level
  • St. John's Bible 7 volume display area on lower level

Libraries Transform Button Giveaway

Throughout the week we'll also be giving out a limited amount of buttons with designs by library staff members. We reflected upon the message of transformation in libraries, and now you can wear your library pride wherever you go.

 

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April 8, 2016
by jkremer
Comments Off on Pope Francis’ Joy of Love

Pope Francis’ Joy of Love

2014 Pastoral Visit of Pope Francis to Korea. Photo from Wikimedia Commons

Today, Pope Francis released his apostolic exhortation AMORIS LAETITIA (translated from the Latin to "Joy of Love").  You can read it here in English.

Here is the National Catholic Reporter commentary on it: 'Amoris Laetitia:' Francis challenges the church by Michael Sean Winters (4/7/16).

Read the New York Times article: Pope Francis, Urging Less Judgment, Signals Path for Divorced on Communion.

America's editors offer five takeaways from from Pope Francis' new apostolic exhortation on the family, "Amoris Laetitia"

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April 6, 2016
by jkremer
Comments Off on 19th Century Collections Added- Children’s Lit. and Religion

19th Century Collections Added- Children’s Lit. and Religion

Illustration from a mid-nineteenth century edition of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Private Collection / J. T. Vintage / Bridgeman Images

Illustration from a mid-nineteenth century edition of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
Private Collection / J. T. Vintage / Bridgeman Images. From database.

The Library is pleased to report the purchase of two new collections, housed within the database Nineteenth Century Collections Online:

    • Children’s Literature and Childhood  (NCCO10) - Children's Literature and Childhood provides a wide range of primary sources related to the experience of childhood in the long nineteenth century. Included in the archive are books and periodicals for children including fairy tales, primers and other material related to education, pamphlets produced by child welfare groups, documents and photos related to children and crime, newspapers produced by youths, and much more. Curated by experts in the field of children's literature, this unique assemblage of material is sourced from such renowned institutions as the University of Florida's Baldwin Library Collection of Historical Children's Literature, the National Archives (UK), and the British Library, among others.
    • Religion, Spirituality, Reform and Society (NCCO12)  - This new resource brings together monograph and manuscript collections to help scholars examine religion’s influences on the shaping of politics, law, economics, and society. Manuscripts and monographs explore the intersection of religion and society in the 19th Century enabling scholars to gain understanding of the influence religion had in shaping Western culture.

You can access the Nineteenth Century Collections Online here or go to the Databases tab on the Library homepage and search for "Nineteenth Century".

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April 6, 2016
by jkremer
Comments Off on The Nation Archive

The Nation Archive

nationd-logo-headerThe Library has purchased  access to the full text of the complete archive of The Nation, beginning with its first issue in 1865 to the present (150+ years!).

The Nation is America's oldest weekly magazine and one of its premier journals of opinion. It has long been regarded as one of the country's definitive journalistic voices of writing on politics, culture, books, and the arts, and continues to stand as the progressive voice in American journalism.

You can access the Nation Archive here or go to the Journals tab or the Databases tab on the Library homepage and search for "Nation".

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April 5, 2016
by jkremer
Comments Off on Free Speech – Viewed by Generations

Free Speech – Viewed by Generations

Book in Stacks KF4772 .H83 2011

Book in Stacks KF4772 .H83 2011

Pew Report's 2015 on Free Speech: "American Millennials are far more likely than older generations to say the government should be able to prevent people from saying offensive statements about minority groups, according to a new analysis of Pew Research Center survey data on free speech and media across the globe."

"Four-in-ten Millennials say the government should be able to prevent people publicly making statements that are offensive to minority groups". This is "striking given that only around a quarter of Gen Xers (27%) and Boomers (24%) and roughly one-in-ten Silents (12%) say the government should be able to prevent such speech."

From Chronicle of Higher Education article What Students Think about Free Speech, published on April 3, 2016 , "For today’s students, the historic link between free speech and the protection of dissenters and vulnerable groups is outside their direct experience, and too distant to affect their feelings about freedom of speech. As a result, their initial instinct was to be more trusting of the government and other public institutions, including the university, to regulate speech to protect students and prevent disruptions of the educational environment." Authors write in the article, "This generation has a very strong and persistent instinct to protect others against hateful, discriminatory, or intolerant speech, especially in educational settings."

Learn more by reading the above works or visit the Library (in person or online) to discover more!

 

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