May 20, 2018
by Mat Blaine
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Congratulations to our Graduating Student Workers!

The end of the academic year is always a little bittersweet. Sure, we're looking forward to a relaxing summer and excitedly thinking about ways in which we can enhance students' experience here in the library, but we have to wave goodbye to yet another class of fantastic student workers. This year, we bid a fond adieu to Justine Ferrara, Taylor Matto, Erin Monahan, Dana Saad, Liam Fama, Olivia Headen, Sally Ng, and Walid Jawad-Hussain. Their work over the past few years has been critical to our success not only as a library but as a fixture on this campus. Needless to say that they will be missed. 

To continue our tradition of adding a book in each of their names into our collection, we've selected the following to be added to our circulating stacks. Each book selected reflects the subjects that the student devoted their studies to while at Fairfield and will be a valuable resource for future students in the same fields to use in their own research.

 

For Justine Ferrara, who majored in Computer Science with a minor in French

The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World

 

 

 

 

 

For Taylor Matto, who majored in Marketing with a minor in Communications

The End of Advertising: Why It Had to Die, and the Creative Resurrection to Come

 

 

 

 

 

For Erin Monahan, who majored in History with a minor in American Studies

The Woman's Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote

 

 

 

 

 

For Dana Saad, who majored in Chemistry/Biochemistry with a minor in Mathematics

Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past

 

 

 

 

 

For Liam Fama, who majored in Information Systems with a minor in Business Analytics

Human + Machine: Reimagining Work in the Age of AI

 

 

 

 

 

For Olivia Headen, who double majored in Environmental Studies and Communication with a minor in Biology

Confronting the Climate Challenge: A General Equilibrium Assessment of U. S. Policy Options

 

 

 

 

 

For Sally Ng, who earned her MA in Elementary Education

What School Could Be: Insights and Inspiration from Teachers Across America

 

 

 

 

 

And for Walid Jawad-Hussain, who earned his MS in Mechanical Engineering

101 Things I Learned in Engineering School

 

 

 

 

Liam Fama, Dana Saad, Erin Monahan, Justine Ferrara, & Taylor Matto

Sally Ng & Walid Jawad-Hussain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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May 18, 2018
by Mat Blaine
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Spring Finals Recap

At the end of every semester, we're proud to serve so many students as they prepare for finals. In addition to our standard services like double checking citations, lending out phone & computer chargers, and helping students find the perfect resources for their research paper, we always enjoy thinking of fun and effective ways to help our patrons de-stress. Here, as always, are some numbers to help assess those efforts:

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May 15, 2018
by Mat Blaine
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What Stags Should Read this Summer

Written by Taylor Matto '18

Now that classes are finally over, our students will have more time to do things that will help them relax -- including reading a good book! Here is a list of some must-read summer books, all of which will be available all summer long in the DiMenna Nyselius Library’s popular reading section. Browse the entire collection here.

 

How to Stop Time by Matt Haig

How to Stop Time tells a love story across the ages - and for the ages - about a man lost in time, the woman who could save him, and the lifetimes it can take to learn how to live. It is a bighearted, wildly original novel about losing and finding yourself, the inevitability of change, and how with enough time to learn, we just might find happiness. It’s the perfect book to read as temperatures begin to rise and the sun begins to shine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of Us is Lying by Karen M McManus

EW.com has described this book as “Pretty Little Liars Meets the Breakfast Club”. One of Us is Lying is the is the story of what happens when five strangers walk into detention and only four walk out alive. Everyone is a suspect, and everyone has something to hide. Every page will leave you at the edge of your seat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mirror Mirror by Cara Delevingne

Mirror Mirror is the story of sixteen-year-old friends Red, Leo, Rose, and Naomi who are described as misfits; who are still figuring out who they are and who they want to be. Life isn't perfect, but music brings them together, and they are excited about what the future holds for their band, Mirror, Mirror. That is until Naomi vanishes before being pulled unconscious out of the river. If you’re a fan of John Green this book is a must read for you this summer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Anna and the French Kiss is the story of girl named Anna who is looking forward to her senior year in Atlanta, where she has a great job, a loyal best friend, and a crush on the verge of becoming more. Which is why she is less than thrilled about being shipped off to boarding school in Paris--until she meets Étienne St. Clair. Smart, charming, beautiful, Étienne has it all...including a serious girlfriend. But in the City of Light, wishes have a way of coming true. Will a year of romantic near-misses end with their long-awaited French kiss? This story is the perfect book to read while at the beach or lying by the pool.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Renegades by Marissa Meyer

Renegades by New York Times bestselling author Marissa Meyer is the story of Nova and her quest to take down the Renegades. The Renegades are a syndicate of prodigies — humans with extraordinary abilities — who emerged from the ruins of a crumbled society and established peace and order where chaos reigned. As champions of justice, they remain a symbol of hope and courage to everyone... except the villains they once overthrew. Nova has a reason to hate the Renegades, and she is on a mission for vengeance. As she gets closer to her target, she meets Adrian, a Renegade boy who believes in justice — and in Nova. But Nova's allegiance is to a villain who has the power to end them both. This read is perfect for fans of Cinder, Divergent, and The Hunger Games.

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May 10, 2018
by Mat Blaine
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What Fairfield University Seniors Will Miss About the Library

Written by Taylor Matto '18.

It’s that time of year again, as Fairfield University is forced to say goodbye to yet another senior class. There are so many things about Fairfield that our seniors will always hold near and dear to their hearts long after graduation, one of them being our beloved DiMenna Nyselius Library, of course. Here are some things that our seniors will certainly miss about the library after they graduate.

Study Spaces

Whether seniors we’re on stress overload, goofing around with friends, or procrastinating writing that paper for the millionth time -- the study spaces of the library definitely hold a lot of cherished memories.

 

Starbucks

Many seniors have probably taken for granted the fact that Starbucks is a walkable distance from anywhere on campus and is literal steps from anywhere in the library. The closeness and familiarity of our DiMenna Starbucks will definitely be missed.

 

Friendly Librarians

Our DiMenna Nyselius librarians are there for their students no matter what. No matter if you need to ask an important research question or just need to see a friendly face when you’re having a bad day they’re always there. Things will certainly not be the same once our seniors enter the real world.

 

The Human Library

Although the Human Library has only been present at Fairfield for two years, the impact it has made on its students cannot go unnoticed. Learning more about our peers is important to Fairfield students. The stories that were told at the Human Library will always be remembered.

 

Getting Cake During #NationalLibraryWeek

Anyone who says they will not be missing the delicious free cake the library gives to students during National Library Week is absolutely crazy! Something tells me this is not a regular occurrence in the real world.

 

Pop Up Pizza Parties

It’s the little things that mean the most to Fairfield students. The fact that the library cares enough to host a pizza party during a very stressful time for their students means a lot. It’s small and thoughtful things like this that seniors will miss the most.

 

Dogs During Finals Week

There is nothing more exciting than seeing four little paws make their way through the library during finals week. Seniors can only silently pray that their future employers will have similar rules to that of club DiMenna.

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May 7, 2018
by Barbara Ghilardi
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Congratulations to our 2018 Library Research Prize Winners!

On Wednesday May 2nd, Layra Cintron-Rivera, Lydia Dupree, Raymond Kingsbury, and Walt O'Donnell were awarded the 2018 Library Research Prizes of $1,000 and were honored at a reception in the Library. Since there were a number of outstanding applications, the committee also decided to present two honorable mentions to two undergraduate submissions: Diana Olivo and Dana Saad.

Undergraduate winners Layra Cintron-Rivera and Lydia Dupree pictured with President Mark Nemec, Christine Siegel, Interim Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Brent Mai, Dean of Libraries, and Catherine Andersen, Assistant Professor of Biology.

Layra Cintron-Rivera and Lydia Dupree were awarded the undergraduate Library Research Prize for their team research paper entitled "Liver X Receptor activation decreases chronic myelogenous leukemia cell viablility while altering the expressions of genes related to cholesterol, antiapoptosis, and cell differentiation." This paper was written for Dr. Catherine Andersen’s course, Biology Research. Layra and Lydia are senior Biology majors graduating in just a few short weeks. The committee was very impressed with the breadth of their journal articles from library databases as well as their use of library services such as reference help and online guides such as the APA citation guide and poster design tips. Dr. Andersen had glowing remarks for her students saying, "For this project, Layra and Lydia have submitted a completely original and sophisticated scientific manuscript based on their independent research. Layra and Lydia demonstrate an exceptional degree of proficiency and learning in regards to research methodology and professional scientific writing that will support their pursuit of research after graduating this spring."

Graduate winners Raymond Kingsbury and Walt O'Donnell pictured with President Mark Nemec, Christine Siegel, Interim Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Brent Mai, Dean of Libraries.

The winner of the Graduate Research category was a team research project submitted by Raymond Kingsbury and Walt O'Donnell entitled “Effects of Daily Meditation on Ninth Grade Students”. This paper was written as part of their course Intro Educational Research taught by Dr Barbara Welles. Both Raymond and Walt are pursuing the Masters of Arts in Education from the Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions. Raymond and Walt utilized a variety of library resources, particularly databases (such as ERIC and Education Database), research and citation guides from the library website, and learned how to utilize keywords to find the right research articles during an appointment with a librarian. Dr. Welles commented, "Effects of Daily Meditation is a brilliant project because it is simple to administer, the results could easily be compared to other studies, and the possible positive effects for students and teachers is attainable with inexpensive measures. These two young men are reflective thinkers who are strongly committed to social justice. By doing this project they are giving their students a useful tool for helping each to achieve an equitable future."

Honorable Mentions were awarded to undergraduates Diana Olivo for her research in support of her project entitled "Political Origins of Corruption in Venezuela" and to Dana Saad for her research in support of her project entitled "The Role of Women in Ancient Rome". Diana and Dana are both graduating seniors.

The panel of Library Research Prize judges was composed of the members of the faculty library committee and librarians. All of the applications were judged by librarians, Christina McGowan, Barbara Ghilardi and Jeremiah Mercurio. In addition, Rajasree Rajamma, Associate Professor of Marketing, and Catherine Anderson, Assistant Professor of Biology and Chair of the Library Faculty Committee, judged the Graduate submissions. Reviewing the undergraduate submissions were Adam Rugg, Assistant Professor of Communication, Elizabeth Boquet, Professor of English, Joshua Eliiot, Assistant Professor of the Practice & Director of Educational Technology and Secondary Education, Jiwei Xiao, Associate Professor and Chair of Modern Languages & Literature, and Eileen O’Shea, Associate Professor of Nursing.

Thank you to Fairfield University's School of Nursing, the Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions, Dolan School of Business, College of Arts and Sciences, and the School of Engineering for their financial support of the prizes, in addition to the Library's financial commitment. 

Congratulations to all our winners!

Graduate winners Walt O'Donnell and Raymond Kingsbury, Honorable mention winner Dana Saad, Undergraduate winners Lydia Dupree and Layra Cintron-Rivera, and Honorable mention winner Diana Olivo.

 

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